The After Report about Kansas City Auction


 Well, as you know and I will admit a 1966 Impala Station Wagon is NOT a Muscle Car.  However, the station wagon was the basis for a lot of drag strip cars during the era of the Muscle Car.  And the Impala would have been probably the most used.  This particular car sold for dirt cheap.  An actual $3,250 car in great shape with its original 327 under the hood.

 There were plenty of bargains to be had at Kansas City. Check out www.mecum.com for the auction details from Kansas City and be sure to compare my last blog with my estimates for the cars I tagged ahead of time.  While it may seem like I am bragging (maybe just a little), my estimates came right on-line for the 3 that sold and the other 4 did not sell because the bids did not reach the reserve on those vehicles.  Obviously the collectors are still picking their needed cars and that means the “average” cars are going real cheap when someone wants to buy one.

Another vehicle that would be a “Collector” car not a Muscle Car would be this 1975 Chevrolet Caprice that sold for a figure of $9,000.  General Motors stopped factory production of convertibles in 1975 for all divisions except Cadillac which ended the run in 1976.  This is the final year of convertible production for a Chevrolet, from the factory.

The white car is of course a 1970 Road Runner and while it came from the factory with a 383 and not a 440 that means the price for this one was $25,000 instead of the usual $40,000 these usually bring. Note the Air Grabber hood.  The “door” in the hood is actually a vacuum operated scoop that pops up out of the hood to feed fresh air to the engine for increased horsepower.  Nice and rare factory option.

The next cars are “continuation” models, meaning while they are built after the 1971 model year, they are what was previously Muscle Car Models.  For those who like the Mopar vehicles of the Era these are the cheapest way to get a Mopar Muscle Car with the “look” from the era of the Muscle Car.  The 1973 Plymouth Road Runner has the original 340 under the hood and sold for $12,500.

Next up is a 1972 Satellite Sebring Plus with the 340 cubic inch engine.  Original throughout and only cost someone $8,500 to take it home.  They also had a 1972 Sebring that sold for an even $10,000 at the Auction, also with the 340.

Then there was a 1973 Dodge Charger Super Bee replica with a 440 and the air grabber hood that sold for $16,000.  Early years for the Super Bee were based on the Coronet body, but  later models were based on the Charger body.  So this would be an accurate “clone” even though the fender tags will tell people it is “just” a Charger.

Then to show you what earlier Super Bees looked like we come to our final picture for this post.  This is a 1970 Dodge Super Bee.  This car came with a 383 that is gone and now has been replaced with a bigger 440 engine.  Because it is not a numbers matching car it sold for a low $16,500.  Even with the non matching engine under the hood this car will “retail” for somewhere in the $40,000 range.

While the prices of these cars may seem low and they are remember the price a collector or a dealer buys a vehicle for at an auction usually means he is the one who will benefit from the savings.

Well, that’s it for now.  The next big Mecum Auction will be January in Kissimmee, Florida and then there are the half-dozen Arizona Auctions also even earlier in the month (January).

Guess, I should start looking through all their listings now to get ready.  Take care everyone and remember that a Muscle Car is an Investment that you can actually enjoy having.

Davey Boy

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